logo
Cheapest prices on the whole darn planet
When we say cheapest prices - WE MEAN IT! 
Compare Amazon and eBay Prices against one another and see for yourself!
Thanks for shopping with us...
Check Amazon Prices
multi mode filber lc lc

Check Ebay Prices

check ebay prices

Fiber Optic Cables

fiber optic cables



A fiber optic cables, also known as an optical-fiber cable, is an assembly similar to an electrical cable, but containing one or more optical fibers that are used to carry light. The optical fiber elements are typically individually coated with plastic layers and contained in a protective tube suitable for the environment where the cable is used. Different types of cable[1] are used for different applications, for example, long distance telecommunication, or providing a high-speed data connection between different parts of a building.


fiber optic cables Optical fiber consists of a core and a cladding layer, selected for total internal reflection due to the difference in the refractive index between the two. In practical fibers, the cladding is usually coated with a layer of acrylate polymer or polyimide. This fiber optic cables coating protects the fiber from damage but does not contribute to its optical wave-guide properties. Individual coated fibers (or fibers formed into ribbons or bundles) then have a tough resin buffer layer or core tube(s) extruded around them to form the cable core. Several layers of protective sheathing, depending on the application, are added to form the cable. Rigid fiber assemblies sometimes put light-absorbing ("dark") glass between the fibers, to prevent light that leaks out of one fiber from entering another. This reduces cross-talk between the fibers, or reduces flare in fiber bundle imaging applications.[2]
Left: LC/PC connectors
Right: SC/PC connectors
All four connectors have white caps covering the ferrules.


For indoor applications, the jacketed fiber is generally enclosed, together with a bundle of flexible fibrous polymer strength members like aramid (e.g. Twaron or Kevlar), in a lightweight plastic cover to form a simple cable. Each end of the cable may be terminated with a specialized optical fiber connector to allow it to be easily connected and disconnected from transmitting and receiving equipment.
Fiber-optic cable in a Telstra pit
Investigating a fault in a fiber cable junction box. The individual fiber cable strands within the junction box are visible.
An optical fiber breakout cable
Fiber-optic ribbon cable
'Ribbon' type fiber optic cables can house many more fibers than 'loose tube' types.


For use in more strenuous environments, fiber optic cables a much more robust cable construction is required. In loose-tube construction the fiber is laid helically into semi-rigid tubes, allowing the cable to stretch without stretching the fiber itself. This protects the fiber from tension during laying and due to temperature changes. Loose-tube fiber may be "dry block" or gel-filled. Dry block offers less protection to the fibers than gel-filled, but costs considerably less. Instead of a loose tube, the fiber may be embedded in a heavy polymer jacket, commonly called "tight buffer" construction. Tight buffer cables are offered for a variety of applications, but the two most common are "Breakout" and "Distribution". Breakout cables normally contain a ripcord, two non-conductive dielectric strengthening members (normally a glass rod epoxy), an aramid yarn, and 3 mm buffer tubing with an additional layer of Kevlar surrounding each fiber. The ripcord is a parallel cord of strong yarn that is situated under the jacket(s) of the cable for jacket removal.[3] Distribution cables have an overall Kevlar wrapping, a ripcord, and a 900 micrometer buffer coating surrounding each fiber. These fiber units are commonly bundled with additional steel strength members, again with a helical twist to allow for stretching.


A critical concern in outdoor cabling is to protect the fiber from damage by water. This is accomplished by use of solid barriers such as copper tubes, and water-repellent jelly or water-absorbing powder surrounding the fiber.

Finally,fiber optic cables the cable may be armored to protect it from environmental hazards, such as construction work or gnawing animals. Undersea cables are more heavily armored in their near-shore portions to protect them from boat anchors, fishing gear, and even sharks, which may be attracted to the electrical power that is carried to power amplifiers or repeaters in the cable.

Modern cables come in a wide variety of sheathings and armor, designed for applications such as direct burial in trenches, dual use as power lines, installation in conduit, lashing to aerial telephone poles, submarine installation, and insertion in paved streets.  Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables Fiber Optic Cables.


Your place on the web for all of your network connectivity needs.  We use amazon fulfillment on our site so you can feel safe, secure and comfortable with using their familiar purchase process which is globally recognizable.

© Copyright 2022 - buycablesnow.com - All Rights Reserved
buycablesnow.com is a participant in the Amazon Associates program and as such may earn a commission from qualifying purchases made on this site.
© Copyright 2022 - All Rights Reserved
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram